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How To Restore Multiple SQL Databases At One Time

Wednesday, September 9, 2015 - by Keith A. Smith

One of the things I had on my to-do list was to take backups of a few SQL databases used by production systems, this way testing could be done in a separate environment. During the last Maintenance window, I got a chance to do this.

The steps were:

1. Spin up a new server (perform normal S.O.P for provisioning)
2. Install SQL Server
3. On the new test SQL server, Add/create security logins (they need to match the source, which would the SQL server where the database came from)
4. On prod servers, that had multiple databases I setup a Maintenance plan that would take a full backup of the databases I selected.  

I did this because it was a quick and easy way to backup multiple databases in one fell swoop. I stop the services on the application servers to halt data being written then execute the Maintenance plan.

At this point, I move all the backups to the new test SQL server. I now have backups of all the databases I wanted in. bak files. I now am tasked with having to restore quite a few databases to this new SQL server. It would be great if I could do the reverse of #4 and restore multiple SQL databases at the same time, unfortunately that is not an option from within the SQL Management studio. I could have created SSIS Packages to copy the data between data sources but chose not to on this opportunity.

I had an idea! If you go in the SQL Management Studio, then go through all the steps to do the SQL database restore, choose a source and destination database. Then go to the script drop down to copy the T-SQL script

 

which looked like this

RESTORE DATABASE [DBNAME] FILE = N'DBNAME' FROM  DISK = N'v:\DBNAME_backup_2015_09_09_RANDOM.bak' WITH  FILE = 1,  NOUNLOAD,  STATS = 10
GO

Where the DBNAME is that would be the database name as it would show in the SQL Management studio. Now with the T-SQL script there I wanted to get the names of all the SQL backups, for this I ran the following from a command line

driveletter:\folder\dir /b>list.txt

This will create the text file inside that folder.  If you want the file output elsewhere, use a fully qualified name. Remember that Windows uses \ as the directory delimiter, not /

Now using the list.txt file I created, I take the names of the databases and insert them in the T-SQL script where it says DBNAME. I do this for each database using some other methods to speed this part up. Once this is completed I execute the query; it took a few minutes, but results show no errors when completed. I refresh the Object Explorer, and now all the databases are attached. 

I was able to change a string on a test application server, and point it at the new test SQL to confirm that the application was going to work. A Restart of a few services and success! Data is present and current at least at the time of the backup. 
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